More information on alternative energy sources can be found here

Coal and oil, as sources of energy, are gradually being phased out. Not only do they pollute the air, water, and soil, but they're also finite in quantity - someday they will run out and no matter how hard you try you won't be able to find any more to heat your condo. So if you can, it's a good idea to start making the transition to alternative energy sources. If you're not sure what they are, here are some of the options currently going around.

Hydro

Hydroelectric generators have been in use for a long time. Much of the electricity in southern Ontario already comes from hydroelectric generators, which work by using the natural power of flowing water to turn turbines in a generator. Before, only homes near lakes and rivers big enough to support a generator could be powered this way, but new technology is working on making small generators and tidal generators more feasible.

Solar

A lot of energy gets wasted every day. It shines down from the sun and is absorbed and re-radiated from your composite decking material. If you had some solar panels, this energy could be absorbed, stored, and used to heat your home and power your appliances. Solar energy is becoming more and more efficient and affordable. You can even buy modular panels at hardware stores that make it possible to increase your solar capacity gradually as you can afford to.

Wind

Windmills have come a long way from the Dutch spinners depicted in nursery art. Today's wind turbines can catch wind coming from any direction and turn it into usable electricity that can be used to supplement or replace your dependence on the common power grid. Wind turbines are of more use in windy areas, but today's lightweight blades will turn even in gentle breezes, making them more viable than ever before. Large turbines can be used by power companies while smaller ones are suitable for mounting on roofs.

Geothermal

The crown glory of alternative energy sources is geothermal, however. It is very expensive starting up but afterwards it provides you with free home heat (and sometimes electricity too) in perpetuity. By drilling down into the hot rock under the surface and running a pipe down, water fed into the pipe can be heated and returned as steam without the type of combustion usually used to run a heater. However, it is not possible to tap into geothermal energy everywhere.




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